Many homeowners choose to feature a gas cooktop in their kitchen design, bringing exceptionally strong heat and easily adjustable temperatures to their cooking space. A gas cooktop is a great choice for home chefs hoping to craft restaurant quality dishes, but you won’t be able to take advantage of this powerful appliance if the cooktop won’t light.

There are a host of problems that can result in a gas cooktop that won’t light, and this common issue afflicts both standalone gas cooktops and gas cooking ranges. To help you tackle this roadblock head-on, we’ve compiled some helpful information on how to fix a gas cooktop that won’t light.

Check For Food Debris

You probably use your cooktop almost every day, and as a result it can become one of the dirtiest appliances in your home. Food debris and grease can collect across your cooktop and within your burners, blocking gas flow to the igniter and preventing the cooktop from lighting.

If your cooktop will not ignite, you should first examine the appliance and clean any food or grease buildup from faulty burners. To effectively clean a burner that won’t light, you should remove its grate and burner cap, and then lift off the cooktop’s sealed burner base. Depending on the cooktop, you may need to remove some screws before lifting off the burner base.

Once each component is removed, clean the area surrounding the burner with a warm, soapy washcloth. You should also soak the burner base in warm water or vinegar, using a brush to remove any food debris from the base. Before reinstalling the grill, burner cap, and base, you should clean out any food from the burner holes. These holes are located where the flame ignites, and can be easily blocked by food particles.

If cleaning the cooktop does not solve your problem, there may be an issue with the cooktop’s connections or igniter.

Examine Cooktop For Loose Connections

Cooktops are not as complex as many other home appliances, but they still utilize a number of electrical connections in order to operate. Connections between the igniter and the control module can come loose during installation or cleaning, and result in a cooktop that won’t spark to ignite the burner.

To troubleshoot this issue, you should first kill power to the cooktop by either flipping the kitchen’s breaker switch or unplugging your unit from the wall. Next, remove the grate, burner cap, and sealed burner base from the faulty burner. With these parts removed, you can inspect the area around the burner for disconnected or loose wires. Secure and reconnect any troublesome wires, reinstall the removed parts, and restore power to the stove in order to test the connections.

Replacing and securing loose wires is a challenge for many homeowners. If you suspect your cooktop problems are the result of loose connections, consider enlisting assistance from a factory-certified appliance repair service.

Inspect Cooktop Igniter

If your gas cooktop is clean and features strong wire connections, there may be a problem with its igniter. While old gas cooktops and cooking ranges feature a constantly burning pilot light, modern models feature an electric igniter which creates a spark to light gas for the burner.

Before inspecting your igniter, you can test it to see if it needs to be replaced. An easy way to do this is to switch all the lights off in your kitchen and turn the cooktop’s control knob to the ignite position. If the igniter sparks an orange or yellow color, instead of a bright bluish-white, you should probably replace the igniter.

If you need to invest in a new igniter, you can use your cooktop’s model number to find the replacement you need. To replace the igniter, you should cut the gas and power to the stove and remove the burner cap and base. Once removed, disconnect wires coming from the faulty igniter and replace it with your new igniter. After replacing the igniter, be sure to test the burner to ensure your replacement works. For assistance with replacing a gas cooktop’s igniter, be sure to contact a professional appliance repair expert.

Other Potential Causes

Excess food debris, loose wire connections, or a faulty igniter are common causes of a gas cooktop that will not light. But these are not the only factors linked to this problem.

A malfunctioning igniter switch or igniter control module can prevent your cooktop from lighting. Kinks in your unit’s gas supply line may also hinder your gas cooktop’s functionality, resulting in burners that will not light. It is difficult for many homeowners to identify and resolve such specific issues with a cooktop’s components, and it’s smart to reach out to a professional appliance repair technician for repairs.

Problems with a cooktop may also result from the age of the appliance. A standard gas cooktop or cooking range has a lifespan of around 15 years. If you’ve had your cooktop for a long time, you may want to consider investing in a new one. You can use this online collection of gas cooktops to discover some of today’s best models.

Exceptional Factory-Certified Gas Cooktop Repair Service

A gas cooktop that will not ignite is utterly useless, and requires effective and efficient repairs. If you understand some of the most common causes of a cooktop that will not light, you will be better prepared to troubleshoot this issue should it arise. While some common causes of this issue can be solved on your own, when faced with more complex problems, you should consider hiring an experienced appliance repair company to tackle the job.

For assistance with all your gas cooktop or cooking range repair problems, be sure to contact a professional appliance repair service.